Great Neck 11020

We Build Trust

Zavza Seal is an experienced general contracting firm with a passion for delivering excellence. Serving Long Island communities including Suffolk, Nassau, Brooklyn, and Queens. We are a one-stop shop construction company that specializes in waterproofing and insulation along with foundation waterproofing services.

Our Expertise Include:

Waterproofing Services

  • Waterproofing parking structures
  • Concrete commercial roofs

Insulation Services

  • Batt insulation
  • Rolled or reflective insulation
  • Blown in insulation
  • Spray foam insulation

If you are considering any type of solution for foundation waterproofing or insulation services, we are here to help and can provide valuable, time-saving advice.

Get to know Great Neck 11020

Great Neck is a village in the town of North Hempstead in Nassau County, New York, on the North Shore of Long Island. It is one of the lush towns in the United States and is well known for its quiet and serene atmosphere. According to the census held in 2010, the town’s population was 9,707.

The School District and Economy

Great Neck is an upscale community, with one-third of its residents holding white-collar positions. It offers excellent public schools and a median home price that tops $1 million. The village has over 100 parks and playgrounds, including many tennis courts and pools.

Great Neck has many different high schools, including North Shore Hebrew Academy High School, Great Neck South Middle School, and Lakeville elementary school. There are also private schools such as Yeshiva Torah Vodaath High School for boys and Bais Yaakov High School for girls.

The icing on the cake is the waterproofing services homeowners enjoy. For instance, Zavza Seal LLC offers basement waterproofing and concrete crack repair services.

Nearby Neighborhoods:

Great Neck 11020 History & Culture

Before the Dutch and English settlers arrived on the peninsula of Great Neck in the 17th century, the Mattinecock Native Americans originally inhabited the shorelines of the peninsula. It was not until 1681 when the European settlers held the first town meeting. The Mattinecock or Metoac used Long Island Sound as a way to both fish and trade with others.

They referred to present-day Great Neck as Menhaden-Ock. It is speculated that they chose this name because of the large amount of fish in the area. With the arrival of the European settlers on the peninsula in the 1640s, Menhaden-Ock evolved into Madnan’s Neck. By 1670, Madnan’s Neck had further evolved into the current name Great Neck. Local legend has it that the name “Madnan’s Neck” is named after Anne (or Nan) Hutchinson. It is said that Anne Hutchinson tried to take over what is considered present-day Kings Point upon her arrival to the peninsula. However, Anne Hutchinson could not actually procure a land grant or deed for the land that she desired. Her temper supposedly earned her the nickname Mad Nan.

On November 18, 1643, the Hempstead Plains, which included the peninsula of Great Neck, was sold to the Reverend Robert Fordham and John Carman. In the beginning, the Mattinecock Indians and the European settlers cooperated and coexisted very well together. The Mattinecock would teach the settlers their knowledge of the land in exchange for new technology from the settlers. The settlers even started using the Indian currency of wampum. However, this peaceful coexistence would not last forever, and the relationship between the Mattinecock and the settlers quickly began to deteriorate. Settlers often began complaining of unfriendly Mattinecock behavior, claiming that the natives would damage their homes and hurt their cattle. On November 18, 1659, the settlers passed a law that forced the natives to pay damages for white property that they had damaged. The problem between the settlers and the Mattinecock natives over land and property kept growing and finally came to a head in 1684. A commission of settlers had been elected and given the power to appease the Mattinecock and their leader Tackapousha. Tackapousha was eventually paid off, and received 120 pounds sterling for his land. Tackapousha eventually died, and his body still rests at the Lakeville AME Zion Church’s cemetery on Community Drive, across the street from North Shore University Hospital. The Lakeville AME Zion Church is one of the oldest churches in New York State.

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